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  1. #1

    Default CSA Dinner Dress Code Questions

    So you need closed toed shoes for dinner at Feathers and possibly Lemongrass. Last time I wore Birkenstocks that were closed. They have since become unwearable and as my wife puts it, not fashionable. I don't want to bring an extra pair of shoes just for dinner. Are Sanuks acceptable? They aren't that dressy but they are closed and go well with linen pants. They would fit in my bag alot easier than actual dress shoes and I can even wear on the plane. My feet hate to be confined so I rarely wear anything other than flip-flops. I know some people ignore the dress code altogether but I'd rather not.

    Thoughts and opinions appreciated. 3 months to go!

  2. #2

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    Bumpin it back up

  3. #3

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    I had to look up what Sanuks were- and yes they are fine. FYI, Feathers is VERY strict on their dress code. I have seen and talked to numerous couples turned away for not following it. It is well worth bringing the dress shoes to eat at Feathers- the meal is wonderful ! ( you would pay a lot of money to have a meal like it in the states ). My husband had foot surgery before our visit a couple years ago. He had a pair of nice white tennis shoes fitted just for his feet ( special inserts for the surgery). He could only wear these shoes. We had to get a special OK to eat at Feathers because the shoes were not allowed. We did receive the OK, but we had to talk to several people to be allowed at the restaurant. However, like I stated - it was worth it !

  4. #4

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    If Sanuks are at all like Birks, then I think that would be a "no go." However, you can go with nice loafers or more dressy dock siders....I can agree with the previous post that bringing a decent pair of shoes is a small price to pay for a lovely dinner....

  5. #5

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    No they are more like loafers.

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    I wore Birkenstocks last time with no problem but they have worn out now. However I saw a few people with sandals on while there so I wondered who actually checks the dress code. I didn't see anyone get turned away.

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    "a few people"...were they male or female? Only men need the closed toe shoes.

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    I guess it is who ever is in charge at any given time. They were turning away during our visit ! I personally would not risk it.

  9. #9

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    Men were wearing the sandals. I didn't expect them to be turned away because maybe they didn't know the dress code when booking. I'd be kinda pissed if I was turned away due to wearing the wrong shoes.

  10. #10

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    Last time we went to Feathers the dress code was not being enforced very well. Men had sandals, Hawaiian shirts and cargo shorts. Maybe it just depends on who is at the door.

  11. #11

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    Hello, sorry to hijack the thread, is there a way to make a feathers reservation in advance?

  12. #12

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    You can't make reservations for Feathers until you arrive at the resort. Then you can make them up to 3 days in advance. :O)

  13. #13

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    I realize this is not an answer to the original post which has had many responses but I was disappointed that during our recent stay at CSA many guests were not following the dress code. During our stay I observed it more at Lemongrass than at Feathers where there were men wearing cargo shorts, flips flops etc. I don't blame the staff at the restaurants for not enforcing it due to the awkward position it puts them in. If it is a policy of the resort than guests should abide by it or go somewhere else to eat.

    Thanks

    Mainegirl

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by kgillespie View Post
    I realize this is not an answer to the original post which has had many responses but I was disappointed that during our recent stay at CSA many guests were not following the dress code. During our stay I observed it more at Lemongrass than at Feathers where there were men wearing cargo shorts, flips flops etc. I don't blame the staff at the restaurants for not enforcing it due to the awkward position it puts them in. If it is a policy of the resort than guests should abide by it or go somewhere else to eat.

    Thanks

    Mainegirl
    I'll agree with this one, and CSA is not alone in the "issue".

    Show respect for your gracious hosts by following the simple rules they have in place, folks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisJamie View Post
    I'll agree with this one, and CSA is not alone in the "issue".

    Show respect for your gracious hosts by following the simple rules they have in place, folks.
    I agree with this as well, it anoys me when some slob walks into dinner with a t shirt, flip flops or sneakers & a bathing suite or crappy shorts. Is it too much to ask to put on a nice pair of shorts, a nice shirt & the proper footwear? Ya dont have to dress eloquent, just show some class & respect for yourself & the resort.

  16. #16

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    I suspect that many people don't know about the dress code in advance so they don't pack for it. If I just booked from a travel website or something I would have no idea about the dress codes or tipping policies.

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    It's rare we get to get in our " good gear" with our sweeties, so just do it. just one of the aspects of our beautiful paradise!

  18. #18

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    Had I relied on the TA alone and not done my homework I wouldn't know about a lot of rules such as tipping, dress codes, and other inclusions.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by melody View Post
    Last time we went to Feathers the dress code was not being enforced very well. Men had sandals, Hawaiian shirts and cargo shorts. Maybe it just depends on who is at the door.
    When we were at CSA, dress codes weren't enforced anywhere. We saw people eating at the Palms in bathings suits without cover ups.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Molly229 View Post
    When we were at CSA, dress codes weren't enforced anywhere. We saw people eating at the Palms in bathings suits without cover ups.
    I think we're talking about dinner here, I wouldn't know why anyone would be in bathing suites at night. daytime is much more laxed, bathing suites with coverups are acceptable for lunch & breakfast, but dinner is proper attire required, it depends on who's at the desk whether or not they impose it or not.

  21. #21

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    I agree with sonofthebeach, when we were there I never even saw anyone attempt dinner in a bathing suit. Breakfast and lunch were a totally different story, most everyone had on bathing suits with some sort of coverup. I figured those that were actually dressed were those folks that were leaving that day, I could be wrong but they looked less happy than the rest of us and I know that was me the day we ate breakfast in clothes. One day we were walking on the beach and were near Palms and my husband decided we should stop for lunch, I didn't have any shoes on but I figured we'd get our table and I could see where he sat and I'd go for my shoes and come back. Immediately when the hostess approached us they VERY POLITELY noted my lack of footwear, when I explained what our plan was she smiled and showed my husband to a table while I waited by the entrance, she made sure I knew where he was and I went off for my shoes. I appreciated the way the situation was handled, both the fact that the dress code was enforced and the polite manner in which it was enforced.

  22. #22

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    This is why I stick to the Cabana Grill for lunch. I stay in my bathing suit and can even eat at the swim up bar or take my patty to go back to the beach.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonofthebeach View Post
    I think we're talking about dinner here, I wouldn't know why anyone would be in bathing suites at night. daytime is much more laxed, bathing suites with coverups are acceptable for lunch & breakfast, but dinner is proper attire required, it depends on who's at the desk whether or not they impose it or not.
    Bathing suits w/o coverups are not supposed to be allowed at lunch but like Molly, we saw a few people sitting in there for lunch with only a suit on when we were there in Oct. Men are not supposed to be allowed without a shirt for lunch either.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonofthebeach View Post
    I think we're talking about dinner here, I wouldn't know why anyone would be in bathing suites at night. daytime is much more laxed, bathing suites with coverups are acceptable for lunch & breakfast, but dinner is proper attire required, it depends on who's at the desk whether or not they impose it or not.
    We saw, at dinner, open toe sandals on men wearing pants and golf type shirts, during the day, not everyone wore a coverup when eating at the restaurants. It's not enforced that we saw.

  25. #25

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    I think it is very it or miss, depending on who is working at the time. During the stay where we saw bathing suits during the day and sandals, etc at Feathers, my husband was also reminded to put his shirt on prior to be seated for lunch at Patois. It was folded inside his towel an he just forgot to put it on but she couldn't have known it was in there. The lady who seated us just nicely reminded us of the dress code. I am assuming she was not working the day we saw people in swimming suits.

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