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  1. #1

    Default Immigration/Customs C5 Card - another reminder

    For those of you traveling to Jamaica for the first time, you will have to complete an Immigration/Customs card on the flight over before you land.
    The flight atendants will tell you that you need only one card per family.
    They have told the passengers this every time we have been - however, they are incorrect.
    Every passenger over the age of 18 must complete the form.
    (The Head of household or parent must add the "under 18" to their card).
    We learned the first time but every year we watch visitors head to the immigration lines only to be told that they must each complete a card before getting in the (usually) long lines.

    On the trip back (to the states), you will need to only complete one customs card per family unit.

    Just a FYI since I always see the displeasure and aggravation on the faces of the passengers/visitors who only completed the one card going into Jamiaca................
    Stan & Susan ("StanSuzie")
    New Orleans, Louisiana
    CSS April 2010
    CSS April 2011
    CSS May 2012

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    140

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    thanks! great tip.

    I have another customs question. when bringing back rum and coffee I have heard people say they declare it but they also get in regular customs line not the one for bringing back agricultural stuff. the whole thing has me confused and worried. I will definitely be bringing back rum and coffee and I don't want to lie on my customs form. The websites about customs only confuse me even more. Can any one who has done it the right way tell me what to do and what to expect.

    thank you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    107

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shartalin View Post
    thanks! great tip.

    I have another customs question. when bringing back rum and coffee I have heard people say they declare it but they also get in regular customs line not the one for bringing back agricultural stuff. the whole thing has me confused and worried. I will definitely be bringing back rum and coffee and I don't want to lie on my customs form. The websites about customs only confuse me even more. Can any one who has done it the right way tell me what to do and what to expect.

    thank you.
    Agriculture is living things like plants and animals. Rum and coffee are prepared. Another tip. If they ask if you have food and you have hot sauce (which I really don't consider food) say yes. I got ripped at BWI a few years ago for not saying it was food. LOL. Live and learn. After many, many trips I am still learning their definitions.

    Carol and Dave...

    PS. concerning the original trip, may daughter and I just fought this battle coming home from a cruise. (I won and we had 2 forms.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    257

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    Declare the items on your sheet coming back to the U.S. No need to get into the agricultural line. That's for plants or food.

  5. #5

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    While on vacation, I keep the receipts together for anything we purchased like coffee, rum, t-shirts etc. On the back on the customs form, I fill in everything we purchased and the price. I'm not sure but I know you can bring back at least $400 pp duty free. It may be $600 pp. Hopefully, someone can confirm the dollar amount allowed per person. So far, we just zip right through customs.
    Also, on the flight down, be sure to fill out the very bottom of the immigration form with your information and return flight information. They will give this bottom part to you to keep for your return flight. Hope this helps.

  6. #6

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    Returning U.S. citizens who have been away for 48 hours or more are allowed to bring back, once every 30 days, US$800 worth of merchandise duty-free. You'll be charged a flat rate of 10% duty on the next US$1,000 worth of purchases. Be sure to have your receipts handy. On gifts, the duty-free limit is US$100. You cannot bring fresh foodstuffs into the United States; canned foods, however, are allowed. SO COFFEE WOULD FALL UNDER THIS.......


    Alcoholic Beverages: One liter (33.8 fl. oz.) of alcoholic beverages may be included in your exemption if:




    You are 21 years old.

    It is for your own use or as a gift.



    It does not violate the laws of the state in which you arrive.





    Federal regulations allow you to bring back more than one liter of alcoholic beverage for
    personal use, but, as with extra tobacco, you will have to pay duty and Internal Revenue
    Service tax.

    While federal regulations do not specify a limit on the amount of alcohol you may bring back
    for personal use, unusual quantities are liable to raise suspicions that you are importing the alcohol for other purposes, such as for resale. Customs officers are authorized by Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) make on-the-spot determinations that an importation is for commercial purposes, and may require you to obtain a permit to import the alcohol before leasing to you. If you intend to bring back a substantial quantity of alcohol for your personal use you should contact the Customs port you will be re-entering the country through, and make prior arrangements for entering the alcohol into the U.S.

    Having said that, you should be aware that State laws may limit the amount of alcohol you can bring in without a license. If you arrive in a state that has limitations on the amount of alcohol you may bring in without a license, that state law will be enforced by Customs, even though it may be more restrictive then Federal regulations. We recommend that you check with the state government before you go abroad about their limitations on quantities allowed for personal importation and additional state taxes that might apply.

    In brief, for both alcohol and tobacco, the quantities discussed in this booklet as being eligible for duty-free treatment may be included in your $400 (or $600 or $1,200) exemption, just as any other purchase would be. But unlike other kinds of merchandise, amounts beyond those discussed here as being duty-free are taxed, even if you have not exceeded, or even met, your personal exemption. For example, if your exemption is $400 and you bring back three liters of wine and nothing else, two of those liters will be dutiable. Federal law prohibits shipping alcoholic beverages by mail within the United States. RUM FALLS UNDER THIS......





    Joint Customs declarations are possible for members of a family traveling together.

    Collect receipts for all purchases made abroad. You must also declare on your Customs form the nature and value of all gifts received during your stay abroad. It's prudent to carry proof that you purchased expensive cameras or jewelry on the U.S. mainland. If you purchased such an item during an earlier trip abroad, you should carry proof that you have previously paid Customs duty on the item.

    Sometimes merchants suggest a false receipt to undervalue your purchase. Be warned: You could be involved in a sting operation -- the merchant might be an informer for U.S. Customs.

    If you use any medication that contains controlled substances or requires injection, carry an original prescription or a note from your doctor.



    Read more: http://www.frommers.com/destinations...#ixzz1xVRTsebj
    Quote Originally Posted by Shartalin View Post
    thanks! great tip.

    I have another customs question. when bringing back rum and coffee I have heard people say they declare it but they also get in regular customs line not the one for bringing back agricultural stuff. the whole thing has me confused and worried. I will definitely be bringing back rum and coffee and I don't want to lie on my customs form. The websites about customs only confuse me even more. Can any one who has done it the right way tell me what to do and what to expect.

    thank you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    18

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    Thanks for the tip on the immigration forms. I don't ever remember having to fill out one for each of us but will make sure we do it this time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    140

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    Thank you everyone!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,953

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    Keep blue or black ink pens handy. Flight attendants won't have many if any. Also, keep passport and itinerary available. You will need your pp number, hotel address, flight numbers coming and going. Your passport needs to have the same name; first and last; as your airline ticket.
    Vicky

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